Nature Reserves in County Tyrone

There are many nature reserves on Forest Service land in County Tyrone.

Altadavan (FNR)

The reserve consists of old woodland growing on a small rocky hill enclosed by a stone wall. Oak predominates with birch, hazel, rowan, holly and thorn also present. Some natural regeneration is taking place. The surrounding open land is dominated by typical acid moorland plants. The reserve is the only example of this semi-natural woodland in the locality.

  • Map reference: H596495, 3 miles SE of Augher
  • Hectares: 1.9
  • Old semi-natural mixed woodland
  • Access on foot from car park at St Patrick's Chair 1 mile to the east
  • All year

Altamullan (FNR)

The reserve consists of old woodland and scrub surrounding the site of a mid-nineteenth century farm house and sawmill, now demolished. Many of the planted tree species, beech, sycamore, lime, Scots pine and larch are now overmature and dying. Native species, ash, oak, rowan, alder, willow, hazel and holly occur in good numbers and form areas of scrub. The reserve provides a valuable habitat for many songbirds.

The collapse of the old mill race has allowed water to seep down through the area. This, combined with the shelter provided by the trees has led to the development of rich communities of mosses and liverworts. The old mill dam provides an interesting marsh area.
 

Black Bog (FNR)

The area is generally homogenous displaying an excellent bog flora including pool and hummock complexes. The reserve is bounded on the east by a minor stream adding variety to the area. Butterflies are plentiful in particular marsh fritillaries and green hairstreaks.

  • Map reference: H642812, 11 miles W of Cookstown
  • Hectares: 48
  • Raised bog
  • Access across country from public road north
  • All year

Drumlish (FNR)

The reserve consists of a small strip of old broadleaves beside commercial coniferous woodland. The majority of the old trees are beech and the area is particularly rich in fungi associated with this tree. Over sixty different fungi have been listed here. Old trees are left to die and decay naturally.

Map reference: H352665, 7 miles SW of Omagh

  • Hectares: 1.0
  • Mycology
  • Access direct public road
  • September-November

Killeter Bog (NNR)

The reserve comprises two areas which are fine examples of unspoilt raised bog. Both have pool and hummock complexes and are species rich. Sphagnum spp are well represented as are the sedges Carex spp and sundews Drosera spp.

 

  • Map reference: H086821, H090808, 11 miles W of Castlederg
  • Hectares: 22
  • Unspoilt lowland raised bog
  • Access across country from public road, south and west
  • Spring and summer
     

Killeter Forest Goose Lawns (FNR)

The reserve is in two parts, both of which are unplanted areas of upland blanket bog lying amid extensive areas of commercial coniferous plantation. Both areas are frequented by wintering Greenland Whitefronted geese, a species on decline in Ireland.

The vegetation is typically acid upland bog but it is worthy of note that three species of sundew, Dorsera rotundifolia, D. angelica and D. intermedia have been recorded. A variety of Sphagnum spp occur in the wet pool areas. The geese feed in winter on the Rhyncospera alba - white beaked sedge.

 

  • Map reference: H0993798 and H078826, 12 miles W of Castlederg
  • Hectares: 15.8
  • Greenland white fronted geese in winter
  • Access via forest road on foot
  • December-March

Knockaginney (FNR)


The reserve is a small isolated woodland area comprising an extensive range of trees and shrubs. The predominant tree is oak, many arising from coppice shoots from an older woodland and some planted beech. Hazel, holly, blackthorn and rowan form an understory, spindle and guelder rose are prominent in the shrub layer. Fallow deer are present in small numbers and there is a good songbird population.

 

  • Map reference: H714453, 3 miles W of Caledon
  • Hectares: 6.2
  • Semi-natural woodland and scrub
  • Access via track from public road to the east
  • All year

Knockmany (FNR)


The reserve comprises three distinct features. An area of extremely fine Sitka spruce and Douglas fir planted in the early 1920s. Ardunshine Lough, its associated reed beds and shoreline scrub, which is an important breeding area and winter refuge for a variety of common wildfowl. An area of predominantly willow carr and typical swamp vegetation

  • Map reference: H541550, 2 miles NW of Augher
  • Hectares: 31
  • Conifer heritage stand, wildfowl, scrub covered swamp
  • No access October-January otherwise via forest road on foot
  • Spring 
     

Moneygal Bog (FNR)

The reserve comprises three distinct features. An area of extremely fine Sitka spruce and Douglas fir planted in the early 1920s. Ardunshine Lough, its associated reed beds and shoreline scrub, which is an important breeding area and winter refuge for a variety of common wildfowl. An area of predominantly willow carr and typical swamp vegetation.

  • Map reference: H541550, 2 miles NW of Augher
  • Hectares: 31
  • Conifer heritage stand, wildfowl, scrub covered swamp
  • No access October-January otherwise via forest road on foot
  • Spring

Mullyfamore (FNR)


The reserve is a species rich bog containing fine pool and hummock complexes. There are a wide range of mosses, particularly Sphagnum spp and sundews, Drosera spp. The area is used as a winter feeding station by a small number of Greenland Whitefronted geese feeding on the relatively plentiful white beaked sedge, Rhyncospera alba.

  • Map reference: H105797, 10 miles W of Castlederg
  • Hectares: 13.2
  • Pool and hummock complex bog
  • Access on foot from forest road, west
  • All year

Pomeroy (FNR)


The reserve consists of two basic woodland types:

  • old estate woodland planted between 1780 and 1830 composed of mixed deciduous woodland and virtually pure Scots pine
  • birch and will scrub which has colonised a wet low lying area from which turf has been removed in the past

The woodland is of considerable ecological interest. The Grace Drennan Nature Trail runs through the reserve.

  • Map reference: H712723, 1 mile E of Pomeroy
  • Hectares: 21.5
  • Old estate woodland, scrub, education
  • Access restricted October to January, visitors please report to Pomeroy Forest Office
  • Spring and summer

Slaghtfreedan (FNR)

The reserve comprises two very low lying areas of pool and hummock bog complex. Hummocks are composed of Rhacomitrium languginosum while the pools depict a wide range of Sphagnum spp. The western part of the reserve is bounded by a minor stream, the Golan Water, much frequented by wildfowl, mallard and teal in winter.

  • Map reference: H728859, H735862, 8 miles NW of Cookstown
  • Hectares: 18.6
  • Pool and hummock bog
  • Access on foot

Teal Lough (FNR)

The reserve is a fine example of pool and hummock bog complex. The area is particularly rich in cranberry, Vaccinium oxycoccus and sundew Drosera spp, while the pools contain a wide variety of Sphagnum spp.

Colonies of black headed gulls nest in the reserve as do teal which give the small open areas of water its name. A wider range of wildfowl frequent the lough in winter.

  • Map reference: H731880, 7 miles NW of Cookstown
  • Hectares: 40
  • Pool and hummock bog complex, ornithology
  • Access from public road to north east
  • All year
     
Back to top